Computed and observed ground movements during top-down construction in Chicago

R. J. Finno, L. Arboleda, K. Kern, T. Kim, F. Sarabia

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two detailed case studies of deep excavations in Chicago made with top down techniques are presented. The importance of considering all aspects of the construction process when estimating ground movements is emphasized. Detailed construction records were maintained at both sites. Inclinometers located within the walls, close to the walls and 7 m from the wall provided lateral movements throughout construction. Ground surface settlements were obtained by optical survey of several hundred observation points at each project. In addition, one of the projects included 88 strain gages installed in the floor slabs to measure time dependent responses of the concrete slabs used as lateral support for more than four years. The movements are presented in relation to construction activities and causes of incremental movements are identified. The lateral movements that arose from cycles of excavation and bracing accounted for approximately one-quarter and one-half the total movements at the two sites. Of these, field performance data and results of numerical simulations showed that approximately 40% of the movements arose from the timedependent responses of the concrete floor slabs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages1975-1978
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Event18th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, ICSMGE 2013 - Paris, France
Duration: Sep 2 2013Sep 6 2013

Other

Other18th International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, ICSMGE 2013
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period9/2/139/6/13

Keywords

  • Clays
  • Excavation
  • Ground movements
  • Time-dependent concrete response
  • Top-down support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

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