Conceptual precursors to language

Susan J. Hespos*, Elizabeth S. Spelke

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because human languages vary in sound and meaning, children must learn which distinctions their language uses. For speech perception, this learning is selective: initially infants are sensitive to most acoustic distinctions used in any language, and this sensitivity reflects basic properties of the auditory system rather than mechanisms specific to language; however, infants' sensitivity to non-native sound distinctions declines over the course of the first year. Here we ask whether a similar process governs learning of word meanings. We investigated the sensitivity of 5-month-old infants in an English-speaking environment to a conceptual distinction that is marked in Korean but not English; that is, the distinction between 'tight' and 'loose' fit of one object to another. Like adult Korean speakers but unlike adult English speakers, these infants detected this distinction and divided a continuum of motion-into-contact actions into tight- and loose-fit categories. Infants' sensitivity to this distinction is linked to representations of object mechanics that are shared by non-human animals. Language learning therefore seems to develop by linking linguistic forms to universal, pre-existing representations of sound and meaning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-456
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume430
Issue number6998
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 22 2004

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Language
Learning
Speech Perception
Linguistics
Mechanics
Acoustics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Hespos, Susan J. ; Spelke, Elizabeth S. / Conceptual precursors to language. In: Nature. 2004 ; Vol. 430, No. 6998. pp. 453-456.
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Hespos, SJ & Spelke, ES 2004, 'Conceptual precursors to language', Nature, vol. 430, no. 6998, pp. 453-456. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature02634

Conceptual precursors to language. / Hespos, Susan J.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

In: Nature, Vol. 430, No. 6998, 22.07.2004, p. 453-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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