Considerations on the Use of Neonatal and Pediatric Resuscitation Guidelines for Hospitalized Neonates and Infants: On Behalf of the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the American Academy of Pediatrics

Taylor Sawyer, Mary E. McBride, Anne Ades, Vishal S. Kapadia, Tina A. Leone, Satyan Lakshminrusimha, Norjahan Ali, Stephanie Marshall, Georg M. Schmölzer, Kelly D. Kadlec, Martin V. Pusic, Blair L. Bigham, Farhan Bhanji, Aaron J. Donoghue, Tia Raymond, Beena D. Kamath-Rayne, Allan de Caen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Between 0.25% and 3% of admissions to the NICU, PICU, and PCICU receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Most CPR events occur in patients <1 year old. The incidence of CPR is 10 times higher in the NICU than at birth. Therefore, optimizing the approach to CPR in hospitalized neonates and infants is important. At birth, the resuscitation of newborns is performed according to neonatal resuscitation guidelines. In older infants and children, resuscitation is performed according to pediatric resuscitation guidelines. Neonatal and pediatric guidelines differ in several important ways. There are no published recommendations to guide the transition from neonatal to pediatric guidelines. Therefore, hospitalized neonates and infants can be resuscitated using neonatal guidelines, pediatric guidelines, or a hybrid approach. This report summarizes the current neonatal and pediatric resuscitation guidelines, considers how to apply them to hospitalized neonates and infants, and identifies knowledge gaps and future priorities. The lack of strong scientific data makes it impossible to provide definitive recommendations on when to transition from neonatal to pediatric resuscitation guidelines. Therefore, it is up to health care teams and institutions to decide if neonatal or pediatric guidelines are the best choice in a given location or situation, considering local circumstances, health care team preferences, and resource limitations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2023064681
JournalPediatrics
Volume153
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2024

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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