Consistency in the reporting of sensitive behaviors by adolescent american indian women: A comparison of interviewing methods

Britta Mullany*, Allison Barlow, Nicole Neault, Trudy Billy, Ranelda Hastings, Valerie Coho-Mescal, Sherilyn Lorenzo, John T. Walkup

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Computer-assisted interviewing techniques have increasingly been used in program and research settings to improve data collection quality and efficiency. Little is known, however, regarding the use of such techniques with American Indian (AI) adolescents in collecting sensitive information. This brief compares the consistency of AI adolescent mothers' reporting of sensitive sexual and drug use behaviors gathered through three distinct interviewing techniques: computer-assisted (ACASI), selfadministered questionnaire (SAQ), and face-to-face interview (FTFI). Endorsement of drug use and reporting of sexual activity was highest for ACASI, followed by SAQ, and was significantly lower for FTFI. Relatively strong agreement was measured between ACASI and SAQ, and relatively poor agreement was measured between the ACASI and FTFI. Findings support the use of computer-assisted interviewing techniques with AI adolescents, and implications for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-51
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Anthropology
  • History
  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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