Constrained Parental Autonomy and the Interests of Children in Non-Intimate Families

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Children's age and developmental capacity leave them incapable of making medical decisions for themselves. Decisions for children are traditionally made under the best interest standard. Ross calls into question whether the best interest standard can function as both a guidance and intervention principle, able to be applied across the spectrum of pediatric decision making. Ross describes constrained parental autonomy as an alternative model, arguing that it affords parents the ability to make decisions within the context of their family while upholding a child's current and future interests. Although the model provides a robust framework for intrafamilial decision making, I question whether it can be broadly applied to children living in non-intimate families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-222
Number of pages5
JournalThe Journal of clinical ethics
Volume30
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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autonomy
Decision Making
decision making
Aptitude
parents
Parents
Pediatrics
ability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

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Constrained Parental Autonomy and the Interests of Children in Non-Intimate Families. / Paquette, Erin.

In: The Journal of clinical ethics, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 218-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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