Contact mechanics studies with the quartz crystal microbalance: Origins of the contrast factor for polymer gels and solutions

F. Nelson Nunalee, Kenneth R. Shull*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

A contact mechanics methodology utilizing the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) has been applied to study the spreading behavior of polymer solutions and gels. Changes in the resonant frequency and in the dissipation are monitored as these materials are brought into contact with the electrode surface of the QCM. The primary application is in studies of elastic polymer gels, where spreading over the surface of the QCM is limited by the elasticity of the gel. Simultaneous measurement of the applied loads and displacements, along with measurement of the QCM/gel contact area, the frequency shift, and the dissipation, enable us to calibrate the QCM as a contact sensor. While changes in the frequency and dissipation both depend linearly on the contact area, measurements of the dissipation provide a more reliable indicator. The relationship between the dissipation and the contact area is determined by the solvent viscosity and by the high-frequency intrinsic viscosity of the system of interest. This result is consistent with previous results on the high-frequency rheological behavior of polymer solutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7083-7089
Number of pages7
JournalLangmuir
Volume20
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 17 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

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