Contemporary Attitudes and Practice Patterns of North American Urologists in Investigating Stone-Forming Patients - A Survey of Endourological Society Members

Barry B. McGuire, Richard S. Matulewicz, Rian Zuccarino-Crowe, Robert B Nadler, Kent T Perry Jr*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Recent evidence would suggest a low rate of metabolic assessment in stone formers, even in those deemed as high risk. We wished to assess the attitudes and practice patterns of metabolic work up in North American members of the Endourological Society as part of the management of stone-forming patients. Methods: A 12-question online multiple-choice questionnaire (using Survey Monkey®) was distributed to all members of the Endourological Society through e-mail. Descriptive analyses were performed. Results: A total of 124 North American members of the Endourological Society responded (90% endourologists, 65% fellowship trained). Ninety-seven percent perform metabolic assessments without referring to a consultant. Eighty-three percent use a commercial analysis company and 17% request serum or urine parameters individually. Ninety-seven percent believe that 24-48-hour urine collection is a better way of assessing patients for metabolic abnormalities than a "basic analysis." Many respondents (37%) would be more likely to metabolically assess if results were easier to interpret, and 35% would like assistance/advice in the interpretation of results. At initial investigation of a first-time stone former, 87% of respondents use serum chemistry, 48% use 24-hour urine, 26% use 48-hour urine (two consecutive 24-hour urine collections), 54% send stone for analysis, and 7% do not investigate. On recurrent stone formers, 69% use serum chemistry, 73% use 24/48-hour urine, and 23% send stone for analysis. On routine follow-up, 36% check serum chemistry, 55% use 24-hour urine, 2% use 48-hour urine, and 29% do not metabolically evaluate. The majority agree that pharmacologic therapy plays a strong role in preventing recurrence (90%). After initiating pharmacologic therapy, 59% reassess using serum chemistry and 84% and 7% use 24/48-hour urine collection, respectively. Physicians re-evaluate patients after 1 month (7%), 1-2 months (10%), 2-4 months (44%), 4-6 months (30%), or after 6-12 months (7%). Conclusion: This snapshot assessment of Endourological Society members' practices in the metabolic investigation of stone-forming patients demonstrates wide testing variations. Many physicians expressed interest in assistance/advice in the interpretation of the metabolic assessment results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)460-464
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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