Contemporary survival results and the role of radiation therapy in patients with node negative seminal vesicle invasion following radical prostatectomy

Scott E. Eggener, Kimberly A. Roehl, Norm D. Smith, Jo Ann V. Antenor, Misop Han, William J. Catalona*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) in a radical prostatectomy (RRP) specimen is associated with a guarded prognosis. We evaluated patients with SVI treated in the pre-prostate specific antigen (PSA) (1983 to 1991) and PSA (1992 to 2003) eras. Materials and Methods: Of patients with prostate cancer treated with RRP from January 1983 through March 2002, 220 with SVI were evaluated, including 67 in the pre-PSA era and 153 in the PSA era. Postoperative PSA greater than 0.2 ng/ml was considered biochemical evidence of cancer progression. Survival rates were compared using Kaplan-Meier estimates to calculate progression-free, cancer specific and all cause survival. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to correlate variables with disease progression. Results: The incidence of SVI in the PSA era was lower than in the pre-PSA era (6.0% vs 10.2%, p = 0.001). To date 124 patients (56%) have had evidence of cancer progression. The 4 and 7-year progression-free, cancer specific and all cause survival rates were significantly higher in men with SVI in the PSA era (p = 0.02). PSA at diagnosis, cancerous surgical margins and higher Gleason score were significantly associated with progression. Neither adjuvant nor salvage radiotherapy appeared to confer a significant progression-free survival benefit. Conclusions: The incidence of SVI has decreased in the PSA era. Progression-free, cancer specific and all cause survival rates following RRP in patients with SVI have improved in the PSA era. This may reflect earlier detection in this pathological tumor stage and more favorable prognostic factors associated with PSA screening. Adjuvant radiotherapy does not appear to confer any therapeutic benefit. Salvage radiotherapy can lead to durable PSA regressions in a small percent of men, although no long-term survival advantage can be proved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1150-1155
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume173
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

Keywords

  • Neoplasm invasiveness
  • Prostate
  • Prostatectomy
  • Prostatic neoplasms
  • Seminal vesicles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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