Continuous cerebrovascular reactivity monitoring and autoregulation monitoring identify similar lower limits of autoregulation in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

R. Blaine Easley, Kathleen K. Kibler, Kenneth M. Brady, Brijen Joshi, Masahiro Ono, Charles Brown, Charles W. Hogue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Cerebrovascular autoregulation can be monitored with a moving linear correlation of blood pressure to cerebral blood flow velocity (mean velocity index, Mx) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Vascular reactivity can be monitored with a moving linear correlation of blood pressure to cerebral blood volume trended with near-infrared spectroscopy (hemoglobin volume index, HVx). We hypothesized that the lower limits of autoregulation (LLA) and the optimal blood pressure (ABPopt) associated with the most active autoregulation could be determined by HVx in patients undergoing CPB. Methods: Adult patients (n=109) who underwent CPB for cardiac surgery had monitoring of both autoregulation (Mx) and vascular reactivity (HVx). Individual curves of Mx and HVx were constructed by placing each in 5 mmHg bins. The LLA and ABPopt for each subject were then identified by both methods and compared for agreement by correlation analysis and Bland-Altman. Results: The average LLA defined by Mx compared to HVx were comparable (66±13 and 66±12 mmHg). Correlation between the LLA defined by Mx and HVx was significant (Pearson r=0.2867; P=0.0068). The average ABPopt with the most robust autoregulation by Mx was comparable to HVx (75±11 and 74±13 mmHg) with significant correlation (Pearson r=0.5915; P≤0.0001). Discussion: Autoregulation and vascular reactivity monitoring are expected to be distinct, as flow and volume have different phasic relationships to pressure when cerebrovascular autoregulation is active. However, the two metrics have good agreement when identifying the LLA and optimal blood pressure in patients during CPB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-354
Number of pages11
JournalNeurological research
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Keywords

  • Cerebral blood flow autoregulation
  • Clinical study
  • Lower limit of autoregulation
  • Near-infrared spectroscopy
  • Vascular reactivity monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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