Contributions of Social Factors to Disparities in Prostate Cancer Risk Profiles among Black Men and Non-Hispanic White Men with Prostate Cancer in California

David J. Press*, Salma Shariff-Marco, Daphne Y. Lichtensztajn, Diane Lauderdale, Adam B. Murphy, Pushkar P. Inamdar, Mindy C. DeRouen, Ann S. Hamilton, Juan Yang, Katherine Lin, Donald Hedeker, Christopher A. Haiman, Iona Cheng, Scarlett Lin Gomez

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Black men are more likely than Non-Hispanic White (NHW) men to be diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer. We examined the extent to which social factors were associated with differences in prostate cancer risk profiles between Black men and NHW men [using a modification to the original D’Amico risk groups based on prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score (GS), and TNM stage (stage)], based on individual and combined clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional population-based study of 23,555 Black men and 146,889 NHW men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the California Cancer Registry from 2004 to 2017. We conducted multivariable logistic regression to examine the association of year of diagnosis, block group-level neighborhood socioeconomic status (nSES), marital status, and insurance type on differences in prostate cancer risk profiles between Black and NHW men. Results: High PSA (>20 ng/mL), GS, stage, individually and combined prostate cancer risk profiles were more common among Black men versus NHW men. In fully adjusted models, relative to NHW men, we observed a persistent 67% increased odds of high PSA among Black men. nSES was the factor most strongly associated with racial disparity in high PSA, accounting for 25% of the difference. Marital status was the factor that was second most associated with a racial disparity. Conclusions: nSES was the factor most strongly associated with racial disparities in high PSA prostate cancer. Impact: The influence of nSES on racial disparities in PSA, GS, stage, and prostate cancer risk profiles warrants further consideration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-412
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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