Control of guinea pig intestinal electrolyte secretion by a δ-opiate receptor

J. F. Kachur, R. J. Miller, M. Field

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of opioids on transepithelial potential difference and short-circuit current across guinea pig ileum stripped of one muscle layer were measured in vitro in Ussing chambers. Opioid peptides such as [DAla2, DLeu5]enkephalin and [DAla2, DMet5]enkephalin, which are primarily agonists at δ-opiate receptors, were able to reduce transepithelial potential difference and short-circuit current at concentrations as low as 1 nM. The narcotic drug etorphine was also very potent in reducing short-circuit current, but fentanyl and morphine, which are primarily agonists at μ-opiate receptors, were almost completely ineffective. Ketocyclazocine was relatively ineffective, and β-endorphin had intermediate potency. All opioid effects could be reversed by the opiate antagonist naloxone. Somatostatin also reduced short-circuit current, but its effect was not reduced by naloxone. Chloride flux measurements indicated that the effect of etorphine on short-circuit current is associated with an enhancement of active Cl- absorption. The relative effects of opioids in this system suggest that their actions are being mediated by a specific δ-opiate receptor. In contrast, opioid effects on guinea pig intestinal smooth muscle seem to be primarily mediated by a μ-opiate receptor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2753-2756
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume77
Issue number5 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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