Coping with discrimination: The insidious effects of gender minority stigma on depression and anxiety in transgender individuals

Jae A. Puckett*, Meredith R. Maroney, Lauren P. Wadsworth, Brian Mustanski, Michael E. Newcomb

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: We examined types of discrimination encountered by transgender and gender diverse (TGD) individuals and the associations with symptoms of depression and anxiety, as well as the mediating and moderating effects of coping responses. Method: This online study included 695 TGD individuals ages 16 years and over (M = 25.52; standard deviation = 9.68). Results: Most participants (76.1%) reported discrimination over the past year. Greater exposure to discrimination was associated with more symptoms of depression and anxiety. These associations were mediated by coping via detachment and via internalization, although a direct effect remained. Conclusions: Many TGD people will encounter discrimination and this is associated with greater psychological distress. Engagement in the internalization of blame or detachment partially explains the association between discrimination and mental health issues. These findings elucidate possible avenues for interventions to bolster adaptive coping responses for TGD people and highlight that actions to decrease discrimination are urgently needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-194
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • coping
  • depression
  • discrimination
  • mental health
  • transgender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology

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