Coronavirus disease 2019, reproductive health, and public policy: lessons learned after two years of the ongoing pandemic—the American Society for Reproductive Medicine's Center for Policy and Leadership

Eve C. Feinberg, Jennifer F. Kawwass, Alan S. Penzias, Sigal Klipstein, Peter N. Schlegel, Sean Tipton, Catherine Racowsky*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To describe the experience of the ASRM COVID-19 Task Force over the past 2 years and to discuss lessons learned during the pandemic that can be applied to future public health crises. Design: Descriptive narrative. Subjects: None. Intervention: Creation of the ASRM COVID-19 Task Force in March 2020. Main Outcome Measures: None. Results: Effective pandemic management requires a joint effort on the part of physicians, scientists, government agencies, subject area experts and funders. Conclusion: Reproduction is a fundamental human right that should be protected at all times. Advanced preparation for future pandemics should include appointment of a standing group of experts so that a response is both informed and immediate when a public health crisis arises. This approach will help ensure that the ultimate objective – preserving the safety and well-being of patients and health care workers – is fulfilled. The recommendations put forth in this paper from the ASRM's Center for Policy and Leadership can be used as a template to prepare for future public health threats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)708-712
Number of pages5
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume117
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • ASRM
  • Covid-19 vaccination hesitancy
  • infertility
  • pregnancy
  • public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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