Correlates of 1-Year Change in Quality of Life in Patients with Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: Findings from the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network

J. Q. Clemens, A. J. Stephens-Shields, C. Newcomb, L. V. Rodriguez, H. H. Lai, C. S. Bradley, B. D. Naliboff, J. W. Griffith, B. J. Taple, P. Gupta, N. Afari, S. E. Harte, E. Strachan, W. Guo, J. R. Landis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: We evaluated and identified baseline factors associated with change in health related quality of life among patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 191 men and 233 women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome or chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (collectively referred to as urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome) were followed for 12 months with bimonthly completion of the Short Form 12 to assess general mental and physical health related quality of life, and with biweekly assessment of condition specific health related quality of life using the Genitourinary Pain Index. A functional clustering algorithm was used to classify participants as improved, stable or worsened for each health related quality of life measure. Ordinal logistic regression was used to determine baseline factors associated with change. RESULTS: Physical health related quality of life improved in 22% of the participants, mental health related quality of life improved in 25% and condition specific health related quality of life improved in 47%. Better baseline physical health related quality of life, older age and the presence of nonurological symptoms were associated with lower likelihood of improvement in physical health related quality of life. Better baseline mental health related quality of life, female sex, and greater baseline depression and stress were associated with a lower likelihood of improvement in mental health related quality of life. Better baseline condition specific health related quality of life and more severe baseline urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome pain symptoms were associated with a lower likelihood of improvement in condition specific health related quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: While several nonurologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome factors influenced the trajectory of general health related quality of life over time, only condition specific baseline health related quality of life and urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome symptoms were associated with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome specific health related quality of life change. Significant differences in how urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome impacts various aspects of health related quality of life suggest a multidisciplinary approach to assessment and treatment of these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)754-759
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of urology
Volume204
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Keywords

  • cystitis
  • interstitial
  • prostatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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