Correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in Chicago area children with diabetes (DM)

Jennifer L. Miller*, Dingcai Cao, Jonathan G. Miller, Rebecca B. Lipton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: To correlate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children with diabetes mellitus (DM) with DM control and other family or disease characteristics. Methods: Parents/guardians of children with DM were interviewed about demographics, clinical characteristics, CAM use, health care beliefs, psychosocial variables, and religious beliefs. The child's hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) value from the visit was collected. Statistical analyses included χ2, Fisher's exact test, and 2-sample t-tests. Results: 106 families with type 1 DM were interviewed. 33% of children tried CAM in the last year; 75% of parents had ever tried CAM. Children most commonly tried faith healing or prayer; parents most commonly tried faith healing or prayer, chiropractic, massage, and herbal teas. Children were more likely to have used CAM if their parents or siblings used CAM or their family was more religious. They were more likely to have discussed CAM with their providers if they used CAM. Parents of child CAM users reported more problems with DM treatment adherence. Conclusions: Children with DM used CAM. There were no differences in DM control, demographics, healthcare beliefs, stress, or quality of life between CAM users and non-users. Practitioners should inquire about CAM use to improve DM care for children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-156
Number of pages8
JournalPrimary Care Diabetes
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

Keywords

  • Children
  • Complementary/alternative medicine
  • Diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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