Correlates of participation in a family-based HIV prevention program: Exploring African-American women's motivations and understanding of the program

Rogério M. Pinto*, Mary M. McKay, Marla Wilson, Daisy Phillips, Donna Baptiste, Carl C. Bell, Sybil Madison-Boyd, Roberta L. Paikoff

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between contextual factors and attendance in a family-based HIV prevention program for low-income, urban, African-American women and their children. Participants' motivations to become involved, their concerns about discussing sex-related issues with their children, recruiters' perceptions of respondents' understanding of the program, and environmental stressors were examined. Participants' level of motivation and recruiters' success in improving respondents' understanding of the program were significant correlates of attendance. Stressors experienced by the family and concerns around talking with children about sex were not significantly associated with participation. Recommendations to enhance involvement in family-based HIV prevention programs are made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-289
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment
Volume15
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Keywords

  • African-American
  • Attendance
  • Families
  • HIV/AIDS prevention
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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