Corrigendum to “Design and participant characteristics for a randomized effectiveness trial of an intensive lifestyle intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk in adults with type 2 diabetes: The I-D-HEALTH study” [Contemp. Clin. Trials 46 (2016) 114–121](S1551714415301191)(10.1016/j.cct.2015.11.008))

David T. Liss*, Emily A. Finch, Dyanna L. Gregory, Andrew Cooper, Ronald T. Ackermann

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

The authors regret that in the above article there were some errors in Table 1 and in corresponding text on baseline characteristics. These errors include the following: 1. Numbers for the Standard Care and GLI groups were inverted for medications variables.2. Selected means and percents were incorrectly rounded for Weight (Standard Care), Total cholesterol (Total, Standard Care), Antilipidemic medications (Total, Standard Care) and Antihypertensive medications (Total, GLI).3. We underreported rates of medication use among the study sample for Antiglycemic medications, Insulin, Other (i.e., non-insulin) antiglycemic medications, Antilipidemic medications and Antihypertensive medications.The Corrected Table 1 should read as presented below, with corrected data in bold. In the Results (page 119), Section 3.2 (Baseline characteristics of the randomized cohort), second paragraph, the description of total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol levels should read: Mean total cholesterol was 171.7 mg/dL (SD 44.9), while mean HDL-C was 44.1 mg/dL (SD 13.1). Mean total cholesterol was 172.0 mg/dL (SD 44.9), while mean HDL-C was 44.1 mg/dL (SD 13.1). In the following paragraph, it should read: More than three-fourths were prescribed antiglycemic medications (87.9%) or antihypertensive medications (76.1%), while more than half were prescribed antilipidemic medications (58.3%). Participants randomized to GLI encouragement were more likely than the Standard Care group to be on antiglycemic medications, both overall (92.7% versus 83.2%, P = 0.008) and for non-insulin antiglycemics (86.0% versus 73.1%, P = 0.004). Original text: More than three-fourths were prescribed antiglycemic medications (87.9%) or antihypertensive medications (76.4%), while more than half were prescribed antilipidemic medications (58.6%). Participants randomized to GLI encouragement were less likely than the Standard Care group to be on antiglycemic medications, both overall (83.2% versus 92.7%, P = 0.008) and for non-insulin antiglycemics (73.1% versus 86.0%, P = 0.004). The authors apologize for any inconvenience caused.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-165
Number of pages2
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Corrigendum to “Design and participant characteristics for a randomized effectiveness trial of an intensive lifestyle intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk in adults with type 2 diabetes: The I-D-HEALTH study” [Contemp. Clin. Trials 46 (2016) 114–121](S1551714415301191)(10.1016/j.cct.2015.11.008))'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this