Cost considerations in the management of cancer in the older patient

June M McKoy, Karen A. Fitzner, Beatrice J. Edwards, Motasem Alkhatib, Cara C. Tigue, Narissa J. Nonzee, Carlos R. Bolden, Charles L. Bennett*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients aged 65 years and older represent 12% of the US population yet account for approximately 56% of cancer cases and 69% of all cancer mortalities. The overall cost of cancer in 2005 was $209.9 billion - $74 billion for direct medical costs and $118.4 billion for indirect mortality costs. This paper considers the direct, indirect, and out-of-pocket expenditures incurred by cancer patients ≥50 years of age. Several major empirical studies on supportive care for older patients and cancer-related costs were reviewed. Insurance coverage, hematologic malignancies, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and cancers of the breast, prostate, colorectum, and lung were evaluated. Major sources of direct medical expenditures covered by third-party insurers for patients aged 65 years and older include extended length of hospital stay, home health assistance following hospital discharge, adjuvant prescription medications, lower-risk treatment (for prostate cancer), and advent of new pharmaceuticals (for colorectal cancer). The mean total direct medical cost for breast cancer is $35,164, and the cumulative cost for prostate cancer is $42,570. Emerging targeted cancer drug costs range from $20,000 to $50,000 annually per patient. Additional clinical trials and cost-effective treatments are needed for older patients to ameliorate the disproportionate economic burden among older individuals with cancer. Additional research about cancer costs may also lead to reforms in cancer care reimbursement, and therefore provide access to affordable health care for older patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)851-857
Number of pages7
JournalONCOLOGY
Volume21
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

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Costs and Cost Analysis
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Health Expenditures
Length of Stay
Breast Neoplasms
Insurance Carriers
Health Services Accessibility
Drug Costs
Insurance Coverage
Mortality
Hematologic Neoplasms
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Health Care Costs
Prescriptions
Colorectal Neoplasms
Patient Care
Economics
Clinical Trials
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

McKoy, J. M., Fitzner, K. A., Edwards, B. J., Alkhatib, M., Tigue, C. C., Nonzee, N. J., ... Bennett, C. L. (2007). Cost considerations in the management of cancer in the older patient. ONCOLOGY, 21(7), 851-857.
McKoy, June M ; Fitzner, Karen A. ; Edwards, Beatrice J. ; Alkhatib, Motasem ; Tigue, Cara C. ; Nonzee, Narissa J. ; Bolden, Carlos R. ; Bennett, Charles L. / Cost considerations in the management of cancer in the older patient. In: ONCOLOGY. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 7. pp. 851-857.
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McKoy, JM, Fitzner, KA, Edwards, BJ, Alkhatib, M, Tigue, CC, Nonzee, NJ, Bolden, CR & Bennett, CL 2007, 'Cost considerations in the management of cancer in the older patient', ONCOLOGY, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 851-857.

Cost considerations in the management of cancer in the older patient. / McKoy, June M; Fitzner, Karen A.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Alkhatib, Motasem; Tigue, Cara C.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Bolden, Carlos R.; Bennett, Charles L.

In: ONCOLOGY, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.06.2007, p. 851-857.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Cost considerations in the management of cancer in the older patient

AU - McKoy, June M

AU - Fitzner, Karen A.

AU - Edwards, Beatrice J.

AU - Alkhatib, Motasem

AU - Tigue, Cara C.

AU - Nonzee, Narissa J.

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AU - Bennett, Charles L.

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AB - Patients aged 65 years and older represent 12% of the US population yet account for approximately 56% of cancer cases and 69% of all cancer mortalities. The overall cost of cancer in 2005 was $209.9 billion - $74 billion for direct medical costs and $118.4 billion for indirect mortality costs. This paper considers the direct, indirect, and out-of-pocket expenditures incurred by cancer patients ≥50 years of age. Several major empirical studies on supportive care for older patients and cancer-related costs were reviewed. Insurance coverage, hematologic malignancies, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and cancers of the breast, prostate, colorectum, and lung were evaluated. Major sources of direct medical expenditures covered by third-party insurers for patients aged 65 years and older include extended length of hospital stay, home health assistance following hospital discharge, adjuvant prescription medications, lower-risk treatment (for prostate cancer), and advent of new pharmaceuticals (for colorectal cancer). The mean total direct medical cost for breast cancer is $35,164, and the cumulative cost for prostate cancer is $42,570. Emerging targeted cancer drug costs range from $20,000 to $50,000 annually per patient. Additional clinical trials and cost-effective treatments are needed for older patients to ameliorate the disproportionate economic burden among older individuals with cancer. Additional research about cancer costs may also lead to reforms in cancer care reimbursement, and therefore provide access to affordable health care for older patients.

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McKoy JM, Fitzner KA, Edwards BJ, Alkhatib M, Tigue CC, Nonzee NJ et al. Cost considerations in the management of cancer in the older patient. ONCOLOGY. 2007 Jun 1;21(7):851-857.