COVID-19 mRNA Vaccination Generates Greater Immunoglobulin G Levels in Women Compared to Men

Alexis R. Demonbreun, Amelia Sancilio, Matt E. Velez, Daniel T. Ryan, Lorenzo Pesce, Rana Saber, Lauren A. Vaught, Nina L. Reiser, Ryan R. Hsieh, Richard T. D'Aquila, Brian Mustanski, Thomas W. McDade, Elizabeth M. McNally

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated whether the antibody response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA vaccination is similar in women and men. In a community cohort without prior COVID-19, first vaccine dose produced higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels and percent inhibition of spike-ACE2 receptor binding, a surrogate measure of virus neutralization, in women compared to men (7.0 μg/mL, 51.6% vs 3.3 μg/mL, 36.4%). After 2 doses, IgG levels remained significantly higher for women (30.4 μg/mL) compared to men (20.6 μg/mL), while percent inhibition was similar (98.4% vs 97.7%). Sex-specific antibody response to mRNA vaccination informs future efforts to understand vaccine protection and side effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)793-797
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume224
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • ELISA
  • IgG
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • dried blood spots
  • neutralizing
  • receptor binding domain
  • serological testing
  • vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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