Crime and the Changing Forms of Class Control: Policing Public order in “Toronto the Good,” 1859-1955

Helen Boritch*, John Hagan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper critically examines recent historical research which asserts that policing underwent a major transition from a “class-control” to a “crime-control” model during the late nineteenth century. The authors develop a revised conception of class control based on an expanded definition of public order offenses to test the alternative thesis that the major shift in policing primarily involved a change in the form of class control during the Progressive era. Using data on policing and arrest rates for Toronto from 1859 to 1955, the findings demonstrate that the focus of the police varied across different types of public order offenses revealing a sustained, but complex, pattern of class control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-335
Number of pages29
JournalSocial Forces
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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