Crisis, social support, and the family response: Exploring the narratives of young breast cancer survivors

Karrie Ann Snyder, William Pearse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article explores how 70 younger women diagnosed with breast cancer draw on social support resources. The authors found that most respondents' core support networks were their families, and social support came in several forms including emotional, tangible, and informational. However, the authors also found that many respondents relied on a distinct form of social support, experiential support, which has not been identified in current research. Experiential support is defined as a relationship with someone who has gone through a similar illness and can help provide firsthand information, insight, and even hope. The authors conclude that experiential support is an important area for future research on social support and health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-431
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • family
  • qualitative
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Crisis, social support, and the family response: Exploring the narratives of young breast cancer survivors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this