Critical care for pediatric asthma: Wide care variability and challenges for study

Susan L. Bratton*, Christopher J L Newth, Athena F. Zuppa, Frank W. Moler, Kathleen L. Meert, Robert A. Berg, John Berger, David Wessel, Murray Pollack, Rick Harrison, Joseph A. Carcillo, Thomas P. Shanley, Teresa Liu, Richard Holubkov, J. Michael Dean, Carol E. Nicholson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To describe pediatric severe asthma care, complications, and outcomes to plan for future prospective studies by the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive care units in the United States that submit administrative data to the Pediatric Health Information System. PATIENTS: Children 1-18 yrs old treated in a Pediatric Health Information System pediatric intensive care unit for asthma during 2004-2008. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Thirteen-thousand five-hundred fifty-two children were studied; 2,812 (21%) were treated in a Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network and 10,740 (79%) were treated in a non-Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network pediatric intensive care unit. Medication use in individual Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network centers differed widely: ipratropium bromide (41%-84%), terbutaline (11%-74%), magnesium sulfate (23%-64%), and methylxanthines (0%-46%). Complications including pneumothorax (0%-0.6%), cardiac arrest (0.2%-2%), and aspiration (0.2%-2%) were rare. Overall use of medical therapies and complications at Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network centers were representative of pediatric asthma care at non-Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network pediatric intensive care units. Median length of pediatric intensive care unit stay at Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network centers was 1 to 2 days and death was rare (0.1%-3%). Ten percent of children treated at Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network centers received invasive mechanical ventilation compared to 12% at non-Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network centers. Overall 44% of patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation were intubated in the pediatric intensive care unit. Children intubated outside the pediatric intensive care unit had significantly shorter median ventilation days (1 vs. 3), pediatric intensive care unit days (2 vs. 4), and hospital days (4 vs. 7) compared to those intubated in the pediatric intensive care unit. Among children who received mechanical respiratory support, significantly more (41% vs. 25%) were treated with noninvasive ventilation and significantly fewer (41% vs. 58%) were intubated before pediatric intensive care unit care when treated in a Pediatric Health Information System hospital emergency department. CONCLUSIONS: Marked variations in medication therapies and mechanical support exist. Death and other complications were rare. More than half of patients treated with mechanical ventilation were intubated before pediatric intensive care unit care. Site of respiratory mechanical support initiation was associated with length of stay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-414
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Keywords

  • asthma
  • heliox
  • magnesium sulfate
  • mechanical ventilation
  • methylxanthines
  • noninvasive ventilation
  • pediatric
  • terbutaline
  • variation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Critical care for pediatric asthma: Wide care variability and challenges for study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this