Cryoreduction EPR and13C, 19F ENDOR study of substrate-bound substates and solvent kinetic isotope effects in the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450cam and its T252A mutant

Sun Hee Kim, Tran Chin Yang, Roshan Perera, Shengxi Jin, Thomas A. Bryson, Masanori Sono, Roman Davydov, John H. Dawson*, Brian M. Hoffman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

We recently used cryoreduction EPR/ENDOR techniques to show that a substrate can modulate the properties of both the monooxygenase active-oxygen intermediates and of the proton-delivery network which encompasses them. 1 In the present report we use Q-band pulsed 19F ENDOR (Mims 3-pulse sequence) to examine the substrate binding geometries of camphor (a), through use of the 5,5′-difluorocamphor (c), and 13C ENDOR to examine the binding of 5-methylenyl camphor (b) labeled with 13C at C11 (Chart 1). These probes are examined in multiple states of the catalytic cycle of P450cam and its T252A mutant. As part of this investigation we further report a new cryoreduction reaction, the reduction of a ferroheme to the EPR-visible Fe(I) state, and use it to probe the substrate binding to the EPR-silent ferroheme state. Finally we report the solvent kinetic isotope effect on the decay of the camphor complex of the hydroperoxo-ferric intermediate, the first such measurement on an individual step within the P450cam reaction cycle. Following reduction of oxyferrous-P450cam, this step is the rate-limiting step in camphor hydroxylation, and its solv-KIE of 1.8 at 190 K establishes that it involves activation of the hydroperoxo moiety by transfer of the 'second' proton of catalysis. We suggest that the finding that the heme pocket can exist in multiple substates, including multiple substrate binding locations, even in P450cam, along with the established possibility that the hydroperoxo-ferriheme intermediate can react with substrate, may explain the formation of multiple products by P450s.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3464-3469
Number of pages6
JournalDalton Transactions
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Inorganic Chemistry

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