Cultural proximity and audience behavior: The role of language in patterns of polarization and multicultural fluency

Thomas B. Ksiazek, James G. Webster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cultural proximity is a multidimensional concept, most often used to explain media preferences across national boundaries. The present study extends the construct, revealing its power to explain audience formation within a multicultural society. Portable People Meter data from Arbitron, Inc., was used to compare patterns of television and radio use across Spanish-speaking Hispanics, English-speaking Hispanics, and non-Hispanics in Houston, Texas. The results indicate that language preferences play a powerful role in determining audience behavior. Furthermore, while English-speaking Hispanics exhibit multicultural fluency, the other two populations show evidence of cultural polarization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-503
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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