Cultural psychology as a bridge between anthropology and cognitive science

Stephanie A. Fryberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The theory and methods of cultural psychology begin with the assumption that psychological processes are socioculturally and historically grounded. As such, they offer a new approach for understanding the diversity of human functioning because they (a) question the presumed neutrality of the majority group perspective; (b) take the target's point-of-view (i.e., what it means to be a person in a particular context); (c) assume that there is more than one viable way of being a competent or effective person; and (d) provide a road map for understanding and reducing social inequities. As illustrated in this essay, a cultural psychological approach provides a bridge between anthropology and the cognitive sciences, and in so doing it offers an alternative set of explanations and interventions for group differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-444
Number of pages8
JournalTopics in Cognitive Science
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Keywords

  • Cultural models
  • Cultural psychology
  • Native Americans
  • Point-of-view
  • Underrepresented minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Linguistics and Language

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