Cultural sovereignty in a global art economy: Egyptian cultural policy and the new Western interest in art from the Middle East

Jessica Winegar*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The post-1989 transformation of the Egyptian art world reveals the particular tenacity of colonial logics and national attachments in culture industries built through anticolonial nationalism and socialism. Tensions emerged between and among Western and Egyptian curators, critics, and artists with the development of a foreign-dominated private-sector art market and as Egyptian art begins to circulate internationally. This international circulation of art objects has produced rearranged strategies of governance in the cultural realm, collusions and conflicts between the public and private sector, and, most importantly, a new articulation of cultural sovereignty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-204
Number of pages32
JournalCultural Anthropology
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

Keywords

  • Art
  • Nationalism
  • Neoliberalism
  • Postnationalism
  • Sovereignty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cultural sovereignty in a global art economy: Egyptian cultural policy and the new Western interest in art from the Middle East'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this