Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells

Jennifer A. Laluppa, Todd A. McAdams, E. Terry Papoutsakis, William M. Miller*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment. While many of the culture bag materials gave satisfactory results, all of the tubing materials severely inhibited total cell and CFU-GM expansion. Taken together, our results show that many materials approved for blood contact or considered biocompatible are not suitable for use with hematopoietic cells cultured in serum-free medium. As hematopoietic cultures are scaled up for a variety of clinical applications, it will be essential to carefully examine the biocompatibility of all materials involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-359
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 5 1997

Keywords

  • Biocompatibility
  • CD34 cells
  • Culture materials
  • Hematopoietic cultures
  • Serum-free medium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

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