Current major depression is associated with greater sensitivity to the motivational effect of both negative mood induction and abstinence on tobacco-seeking behavior

Lee Hogarth, Amanda R. Mathew*, Brian Hitsman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Although depression and smoking commonly co-occur, the mechanisms underpinning this association are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that depression promotes tobacco dependence, persistence and relapse by increasing sensitivity to acute negative mood and abstinence induced tobacco-seeking behavior. Methods Twenty nine daily smokers of >10 cigarettes per day, nine with major depression and 20 without, completed two laboratory sessions one week apart, smoking as normal prior to session 1 (sated session), and 6 h abstinent prior to session 2 (abstinent session). In both sessions, tobacco-seeking was measured at baseline by preference to view smoking versus food images. Negative mood was then induced by negative ruminative statements and sad music, before tobacco-seeking was measured again at test. Results In the sated session, negative mood induction produced a greater increase in tobacco choice from baseline to test in depressed (p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.782) compared to non-depressed smokers (p = 0.045, ηp2 = 0.216, interaction: p = 0.046, ηp2=0.150). Abstinence also produced a greater increase in baseline tobacco choice between the sated and abstinent sessions in depressed (p = 0.002, ηp2=0.771) compared to non-depressed smokers (p = 0.22, ηp2 = 0.089, interaction: p = 0.023, ηp2 = 0.189). These mood and abstinence induced increases in tobacco choice were positively associated with depression symptoms across the sample as a whole (ps ≤ 0.04, ηp2 ≥ 0.159), and correlated with each other (r = 0.67, p < 0.001). Conclusions Current major depression or depression symptoms may promote tobacco dependence, persistence and relapse by increasing sensitivity to both acute negative mood and abstinence induced tobacco-seeking behavior. Treatments should seek to break the association between adverse states and smoking to cope.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume176
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • Abstinence
  • Depression
  • Mood induction
  • Smoking
  • Vulnerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Current major depression is associated with greater sensitivity to the motivational effect of both negative mood induction and abstinence on tobacco-seeking behavior'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this