Décalage in infants' knowledge about occlusion and containment events

Converging evidence from action tasks

Susan J. Hespos, Renée Baillargeon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present research, 6-month-old infants consistently searched for a tall toy behind a tall as opposed to a short occluder. However, when the same toy was hidden inside a tall or a short container, only older, 7.5-month-old infants searched for the tall toy inside the tall container. These and control results (1) confirm previous violation-of-expectation (VOE) findings of a décalage in infants' reasoning about height information in occlusion and containment events; (2) cast doubt on the suggestion that VOE tasks overestimate infants' cognitive abilities; and (3) support recent proposals that infants use their physical knowledge to guide their actions when task demands do not overwhelm their limited processing resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCognition
Volume99
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

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infant
Play and Playthings
toy
event
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cognitive ability
Containment
Research
resources
Toys
Violations

Keywords

  • Action tasks
  • Containment
  • Infants physical reasoning
  • Occlusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

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Décalage in infants' knowledge about occlusion and containment events : Converging evidence from action tasks. / Hespos, Susan J.; Baillargeon, Renée.

In: Cognition, Vol. 99, No. 2, 01.03.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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