Data Sharing of Imaging in an Evolving Health Care World: Report of the ACR Data Sharing Workgroup Part 2: Annotation, Curation, and Contracting

Juan Carlos Batlle*, Keith Dreyer, Bibb Allen, Tessa Cook, Christopher J. Roth, Andrea Borondy Kitts, Raym Geis, Carol C. Wu, Matt P. Lungren, Jay Patti, Adam Prater, Daniel Rubin, Safwan Halabi, Mike Tilkin, Tom Hoffman, Laura Coombs, Christoph Wald

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A core principle of ethical data sharing is maintaining the security and anonymity of the data, and care must be taken to ensure medical records and images cannot be reidentified to be traced back to patients or misconstrued as a breach in the trust between health care providers and patients. Once those principles have been observed, those seeking to share data must take the appropriate steps to curate the data in a way that organizes the clinically relevant information so as to be useful to the data sharing party, assesses the ensuing value of the data set and its annotations, and informs the data sharing contracts that will govern use of the data. Embarking on a data sharing partnership engenders a host of ethical, practical, technical, legal, and commercial challenges that require a thoughtful, considered approach. In 2019 the ACR convened a Data Sharing Workgroup to develop philosophies around best practices in the sharing of health information. This is Part 2 of a Report on the workgroup's efforts in exploring these issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Contracting
  • data science
  • data sharing
  • informatics
  • valuation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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