Decline in physical activity in black girls and white girls during adolescence

Sue Y.S. Kimm*, Nancy W. Glynn, Andrea M. Kriska, Bruce A. Barton, Shari S. Kronsberg, Stephen R. Daniels, Patricia B. Crawford, Zak I. Sabry, Kiang Liu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

687 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Physical activity declines during adolescence, but the underlying reasons remain unknown. Methods We prospectively followed 1213 black girls and 1166 white girls enrolled in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study from the ages of 9 or 10 to the ages of 18 or 19 years. We used a validated questionnaire to measure leisure-time physical activity on the basis of metabolic equivalents (MET) for reported activities and their frequency in MET-times per week; a higher score indicated greater activity. Results: The respective median activity scores for black girls and white girls were 27.3 and 30.8 MET-times per week at base line and declined to 0 and 11.0 by year 10 of the study (a 100 percent decline for black girls and a 64 percent decline for white girls, P<0.001). By the age of 16 or 17 years, 56 percent of the black girls and 31 percent of the white girls reported no habitual leisure-time activity. Lower levels of parental education were associated with greater decline in activity for white girls at both younger ages (P<0.001) and older ages (P=0.005); for black girls, this association was seen only at the older ages (P=0.04). Pregnancy was associated with decline in activity among black girls (P<0.001) but not among white girls, whereas cigarette smoking was associated with decline in activity among white girls (P<0.001). A higher body-mass index was associated with greater decline in activity among girls of both races (P-0.05). Conclusions: Substantial declines in physical activity occur during adolescence in girls and are greater in black girls than in white girls. Some determinants of this decline, such as higher body-mass index, pregnancy, and smoking, may be modifiable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)709-715
Number of pages7
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume347
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 5 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Kimm, S. Y. S., Glynn, N. W., Kriska, A. M., Barton, B. A., Kronsberg, S. S., Daniels, S. R., Crawford, P. B., Sabry, Z. I., & Liu, K. (2002). Decline in physical activity in black girls and white girls during adolescence. New England Journal of Medicine, 347(10), 709-715. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa003277