Delayed-release oral mesalamine 4.8 g/day (800 mg tablets) compared with 2.4 g/day (400 mg tablets) for the treatment of mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis: The ASCENDI trial

Stephen B. Hanauer*, William J. Sandborn, Christian Dallaire, André Archambault, Bruce Yacyshyn, Chyon Yeh, Nancy Smith-Hall

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

137 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Delayed-release oral mesalamine 2.4 g/day to 4.8 g/day has been shown to be effective in treating mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis (UC), but it is unknown whether an initial dose of 4.8 g/day is more effective than 2.4 g/day in patients with mildly to moderately active UC and in the subgroup with moderate disease. Patients and Methods: A six-week, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial assessing the safety and clinical efficacy of a new dose (ASCEND I) of medication randomly assigned 301 adults with mildly to moderately active UC to delayed-release oral mesalamine 2.4 g/day (400 mg tablet [n=154]) or 4.8 g/day (800 mg tablet [n=147]). The primary efficacy end point was overall improvement (ie, treatment success), defined as complete remission or response to therapy from baseline to week 6. Primary safety end points were adverse events and laboratory evaluations. Data were also analyzed separately for the prespecified subgroup of patients with moderate UC at baseline. Results: Treatment success was not statistically different between the treatment groups at week 6; 51% of the group (77 of 150) who received delayed-release oral mesalamine 2.4 g/day and 56% of the group (76 of 136) who received 4.8 g/day reached the efficacy end point (P=0.441). Among the moderate disease subgroup, however, the higher initial dose was more effective; 57% of patients (53 of 93) given delayed-release oral mesalamine 2.4 g/day and 72% of patients (55 of 76) given 4.8 g/day achieved treatment success (P=0.0384). Both regimens were well tolerated. Conclusions: Delayed-release oral mesalamine is an effective and well-tolerated initial therapy in patients with mildly to moderately active UC, and a 4.8 g/day dose may enhance treatment success rates in patients with moderate disease compared with mesalamine 2.4 g/day.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)827-834
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Keywords

  • Delayed release
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Mesalamine
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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