Deleterious effects of probe-related versus irrelevant targets on the “CIT effect” in the P300- and RT-based three-stimulus protocol for detection of concealed information

Joseph Olson*, Joel P Rosenfeld, Ella Perrault

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two groups of participants committed the same mock crime in which one of two items, a watch or a ring, was removed from a drawer and concealed. One group, the crime-familiar group next experienced a three-stimulus protocol (3SP), a Concealed Information Test (CIT), in which they were tested on the stolen (probe) item presented in a random series of five irrelevant (unseen) stimuli from the same jewelry category. A left-hand button press, meaning “I don't recognize” was to follow each of these six items. A right-hand press (“I do recognize”) was to follow the one other presented item, the target item, which in the case of the crime-familiar group was the other, not-stolen item in the drawer at the mock crime scene. For the other crime-unfamiliar group, the target was a sixth unseen irrelevant item as in the original P300 CIT. In terms of P300 latency and reaction time (RT), crime-familiar participants processed all stimuli faster than crime-unfamiliar participants. The CIT effects (probe-minus-irrelevant differences) for crime-familiar group members were inferior to those of crime-unfamiliar group members for RT and P300 amplitude measures. Thus, familiar targets negatively impact the 3SP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13459
JournalPsychophysiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Concealed Information Test
  • ERPs
  • P300
  • deception
  • three-stimulus protocol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

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