Responsabilidad, inclusión y gobernanza global: Una crítica de la concepción estatista de los derechos humanos

Translated title of the contribution: Democratic accountability and global governance: Challenging the state-centric conception of human rights

Cristina Lafont*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this essay I analyze some conceptual difficulties associated with the demand that global institutions be made more democratically accountable. In the absence of a world state, it may seem inconsistent to insist that global institutions be accountable to all those subject to their decisions while also insisting that the members of these institutions, as representatives of states, simultaneously remain accountable to the citizens of their own countries for the special responsibilities they have towards them. This difficulty seems insurmountable in light of the widespread acceptance of a state-centric conception of human rights, according to which states and only states bear primary responsibility for the protection of their citizens' rights. Against this conception, I defend an alternative, pluralist conception of human rights obligations. I argue that, once the distinctions between the obligations to respect, protect and fulfill human rights are taken into account, no conceptual difficulty remains in holding states and non-state actors accountable for their respective human rights obligations.

Translated title of the contributionDemocratic accountability and global governance: Challenging the state-centric conception of human rights
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)407-434
Number of pages28
JournalIsegoria
Volume43
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Accountability
  • Beitz
  • Global governance
  • Global institutions
  • Human rights
  • IMF
  • Inclusion
  • Non-state actors
  • WTO
  • World Bank

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy

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