Depressive symptoms among reservation-based pregnant American Indian adolescents

Golda S. Ginsburg*, Elena Varipatis Baker, Britta C. Mullany, Allison Barlow, Novalene Goklish, Ranelda Hastings, Audrey E. Thurm, Kristen Speakman, Raymond Reid, John Walkup

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine rates and correlates of depressive symptoms among pregnant reservation-based American Indian (AI) adolescents from the Southwestern United States (N = 53). Methods: Data were derived from a study evaluating a home-visiting program designed to promote positive parenting among young families. Participants included a volunteer, convenience sample of expectant mothers who completed behavioral and mental health self-report questionnaires. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Three risk domains were analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms: sociodemographics, family relations, and psychosocial functioning. Results: Forty-seven percent of expectant mothers scored at or above the widely accepted clinical cutoff score of 16 on the CES-D; 30% scored at or above 20, a score more likely to reflect elevated depressive symptoms among adolescents; and almost 20% scored at or above 28 (one standard deviation above the mean), a score suggestive of clinical depression. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with less use of public assistance, external locus of control, less social support, and lower self-esteem. Conclusions: Data suggest that a large proportion of pregnant AI adolescents reported elevated depressive symptoms, though rates are similar to non-pregnant AI adolescent samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume12
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

Fingerprint

North American Indians
Depression
Epidemiologic Studies
Public Assistance
Southwestern United States
Mothers
Internal-External Control
Family Relations
Parenting
Self Concept
Social Support
Self Report
Volunteers
Mental Health

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • American Indian
  • Depression
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ginsburg, Golda S. ; Baker, Elena Varipatis ; Mullany, Britta C. ; Barlow, Allison ; Goklish, Novalene ; Hastings, Ranelda ; Thurm, Audrey E. ; Speakman, Kristen ; Reid, Raymond ; Walkup, John. / Depressive symptoms among reservation-based pregnant American Indian adolescents. In: Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2008 ; Vol. 12, No. SUPPL. 1.
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abstract = "Objectives: To examine rates and correlates of depressive symptoms among pregnant reservation-based American Indian (AI) adolescents from the Southwestern United States (N = 53). Methods: Data were derived from a study evaluating a home-visiting program designed to promote positive parenting among young families. Participants included a volunteer, convenience sample of expectant mothers who completed behavioral and mental health self-report questionnaires. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Three risk domains were analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms: sociodemographics, family relations, and psychosocial functioning. Results: Forty-seven percent of expectant mothers scored at or above the widely accepted clinical cutoff score of 16 on the CES-D; 30{\%} scored at or above 20, a score more likely to reflect elevated depressive symptoms among adolescents; and almost 20{\%} scored at or above 28 (one standard deviation above the mean), a score suggestive of clinical depression. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with less use of public assistance, external locus of control, less social support, and lower self-esteem. Conclusions: Data suggest that a large proportion of pregnant AI adolescents reported elevated depressive symptoms, though rates are similar to non-pregnant AI adolescent samples.",
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Ginsburg, GS, Baker, EV, Mullany, BC, Barlow, A, Goklish, N, Hastings, R, Thurm, AE, Speakman, K, Reid, R & Walkup, J 2008, 'Depressive symptoms among reservation-based pregnant American Indian adolescents', Maternal and Child Health Journal, vol. 12, no. SUPPL. 1. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-008-0352-2

Depressive symptoms among reservation-based pregnant American Indian adolescents. / Ginsburg, Golda S.; Baker, Elena Varipatis; Mullany, Britta C.; Barlow, Allison; Goklish, Novalene; Hastings, Ranelda; Thurm, Audrey E.; Speakman, Kristen; Reid, Raymond; Walkup, John.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 12, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.07.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Depressive symptoms among reservation-based pregnant American Indian adolescents

AU - Ginsburg, Golda S.

AU - Baker, Elena Varipatis

AU - Mullany, Britta C.

AU - Barlow, Allison

AU - Goklish, Novalene

AU - Hastings, Ranelda

AU - Thurm, Audrey E.

AU - Speakman, Kristen

AU - Reid, Raymond

AU - Walkup, John

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N2 - Objectives: To examine rates and correlates of depressive symptoms among pregnant reservation-based American Indian (AI) adolescents from the Southwestern United States (N = 53). Methods: Data were derived from a study evaluating a home-visiting program designed to promote positive parenting among young families. Participants included a volunteer, convenience sample of expectant mothers who completed behavioral and mental health self-report questionnaires. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Three risk domains were analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms: sociodemographics, family relations, and psychosocial functioning. Results: Forty-seven percent of expectant mothers scored at or above the widely accepted clinical cutoff score of 16 on the CES-D; 30% scored at or above 20, a score more likely to reflect elevated depressive symptoms among adolescents; and almost 20% scored at or above 28 (one standard deviation above the mean), a score suggestive of clinical depression. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with less use of public assistance, external locus of control, less social support, and lower self-esteem. Conclusions: Data suggest that a large proportion of pregnant AI adolescents reported elevated depressive symptoms, though rates are similar to non-pregnant AI adolescent samples.

AB - Objectives: To examine rates and correlates of depressive symptoms among pregnant reservation-based American Indian (AI) adolescents from the Southwestern United States (N = 53). Methods: Data were derived from a study evaluating a home-visiting program designed to promote positive parenting among young families. Participants included a volunteer, convenience sample of expectant mothers who completed behavioral and mental health self-report questionnaires. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Three risk domains were analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms: sociodemographics, family relations, and psychosocial functioning. Results: Forty-seven percent of expectant mothers scored at or above the widely accepted clinical cutoff score of 16 on the CES-D; 30% scored at or above 20, a score more likely to reflect elevated depressive symptoms among adolescents; and almost 20% scored at or above 28 (one standard deviation above the mean), a score suggestive of clinical depression. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with less use of public assistance, external locus of control, less social support, and lower self-esteem. Conclusions: Data suggest that a large proportion of pregnant AI adolescents reported elevated depressive symptoms, though rates are similar to non-pregnant AI adolescent samples.

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KW - American Indian

KW - Depression

KW - Pregnancy

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Ginsburg GS, Baker EV, Mullany BC, Barlow A, Goklish N, Hastings R et al. Depressive symptoms among reservation-based pregnant American Indian adolescents. Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2008 Jul 1;12(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-008-0352-2