Dermatologic conditions in skin of color: Part I. special considerations for common skin disorders

Roopal V. Kundu, Stavonnie Patterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Skin of color traditionally refers to that of persons of African, Asian, Native American, Middle Eastern, and Hispanic backgrounds. Differences in cutaneous structure and function can result in skin conditions with distinct presentations and varying prevalence that require unique treatment. Skin cancers have different presentations in these populations. The ability to recognize and diagnose skin cancer in a timely manner is important for reducing morbidity and mortality. Basal cell carcinoma often is pigmented, squamous cell carcinoma occurs in areas of chronic scarring and inflammation, and melanoma presents in non-sun-exposed areas, such as the soles and nail beds. Diagnosis requires biopsy, with the technique depending on size and location of the lesion. Treatment options range from topical to surgical. Acne commonly results in postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and keloids. Combination therapy with topical antibiotics and benzoyl peroxide is generally more effective than monotherapy for treating acne. Use of retinoids at lower concentrations and at less frequent dosing can help prevent postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)850-856
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume87
Issue number12
StatePublished - Jun 15 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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