Design and development of low-cost tissue replicas for simulation of rare neonatal congenital defects

Ellen K. Hawkinson*, Lauren M. Davis, Katherine A. Barsness

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies have shown that simulation can be a valuable tool for training pediatric surgeons to perform thoracoscopic repair of rare congenital anomalies [1-3]. The previously evaluated models were high fidelity, hybrid models that required the use of fetal bovine or porcine tissue blocks within a simulated neonate chest cavity. Real tissue blocks can be expensive, and may not be readily available in some parts of the world. We have developed low-cost, portable simulators for esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) and duodenal atresia (DA) that recreate the 3-dimensional challenges for minimally invasive repair. These are fully simulated models of the thoracic and abdominal cavities containing synthetic tissue that replicates the required anatomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014
PublisherIOS Press
Pages159-162
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781614993742
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event21st Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference, NextMed/MMVR 2014 - Manhattan Beach, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 20 2014Feb 22 2014

Publication series

NameStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Volume196
ISSN (Print)0926-9630
ISSN (Electronic)1879-8365

Other

Other21st Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference, NextMed/MMVR 2014
CountryUnited States
CityManhattan Beach, CA
Period2/20/142/22/14

Keywords

  • 3D modeling
  • 3D printing
  • Pediatric congenital anomaly
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

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  • Cite this

    Hawkinson, E. K., Davis, L. M., & Barsness, K. A. (2014). Design and development of low-cost tissue replicas for simulation of rare neonatal congenital defects. In Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21, NextMed/MMVR 2014 (pp. 159-162). (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics; Vol. 196). IOS Press. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-375-9-159