Design of Strain-Limiting Substrate Materials for Stretchable and Flexible Electronics

Yinji Ma, Kyung In Jang, Liang Wang, Han Na Jung, Jean Won Kwak, Yeguang Xue, Hang Chen, Yiyuan Yang, Dawei Shi, Xue Feng, John A. Rogers, Yonggang Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently developed classes of electronics for biomedical applications exploit substrates that offer low elastic modulus and high stretchability, to allow intimate, mechanically biocompatible integration with soft biological tissues. A challenge is that such substrates do not generally offer protection of the electronics from high peak strains that can occur upon large-scale deformation, thereby creating a potential for device failure. The results presented here establish a simple route to compliant substrates with strain-limiting mechanics based on approaches that complement those of recently described alternatives. Here, a thin film or mesh of a high modulus material transferred onto a prestrained compliant substrate transforms into wrinkled geometry upon release of the prestrain. The structure formed by this process offers a low elastic modulus at small strain due to the small effective stiffness of the wrinkled film or mesh; it has a high tangent modulus (e.g., >1000 times the elastic modulus) at large strain, as the wrinkles disappear and the film/mesh returns to a flat geometry. This bilinear stress–strain behavior has an extremely sharp transition point, defined by the magnitude of the prestrain. A theoretical model yields analytical expressions for the elastic and tangent moduli and the transition strain of the bilinear stress–strain relation, with quantitative correspondence to finite element analysis and experiments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5345-5351
Number of pages7
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume26
Issue number29
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2016

Fingerprint

Flexible electronics
modulus of elasticity
mesh
Substrates
tangents
electronics
Elastic moduli
Electronic equipment
transition points
geometry
complement
Geometry
stiffness
routes
Mechanics
Stiffness
Tissue
Finite element method
thin films
Thin films

Keywords

  • prestrain
  • strain-limiting
  • stretchable electronics
  • wrinkle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Ma, Yinji ; Jang, Kyung In ; Wang, Liang ; Jung, Han Na ; Kwak, Jean Won ; Xue, Yeguang ; Chen, Hang ; Yang, Yiyuan ; Shi, Dawei ; Feng, Xue ; Rogers, John A. ; Huang, Yonggang. / Design of Strain-Limiting Substrate Materials for Stretchable and Flexible Electronics. In: Advanced Functional Materials. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 29. pp. 5345-5351.
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Ma, Y, Jang, KI, Wang, L, Jung, HN, Kwak, JW, Xue, Y, Chen, H, Yang, Y, Shi, D, Feng, X, Rogers, JA & Huang, Y 2016, 'Design of Strain-Limiting Substrate Materials for Stretchable and Flexible Electronics', Advanced Functional Materials, vol. 26, no. 29, pp. 5345-5351. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201600713

Design of Strain-Limiting Substrate Materials for Stretchable and Flexible Electronics. / Ma, Yinji; Jang, Kyung In; Wang, Liang; Jung, Han Na; Kwak, Jean Won; Xue, Yeguang; Chen, Hang; Yang, Yiyuan; Shi, Dawei; Feng, Xue; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang.

In: Advanced Functional Materials, Vol. 26, No. 29, 02.08.2016, p. 5345-5351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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