Designing Thin, Ultrastretchable Electronics with Stacked Circuits and Elastomeric Encapsulation Materials

Renxiao Xu, Jung Woo Lee, Taisong Pan, Siyi Ma, Jiayi Wang, June Hyun Han, Yinji Ma, John A. Rogers, Yonggang Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many recently developed soft, skin-like electronics with high performance circuits and low modulus encapsulation materials can accommodate large bending, stretching, and twisting deformations. Their compliant mechanics also allows for intimate, nonintrusive integration to the curvilinear surfaces of soft biological tissues. By introducing a stacked circuit construct, the functional density of these systems can be greatly improved, yet their desirable mechanics may be compromised due to the increased overall thickness. To address this issue, the results presented here establish design guidelines for optimizing the deformable properties of stretchable electronics with stacked circuit layers. The effects of three contributing factors (i.e., the silicone interlayer, the composite encapsulation, and the deformable interconnects) on the stretchability of a multilayer system are explored in detail via combined experimental observation, finite element modeling, and theoretical analysis. Finally, an electronic module with optimized design is demonstrated. This highly deformable system can be repetitively folded, twisted, or stretched without observable influences to its electrical functionality. The ultrasoft, thin nature of the module makes it suitable for conformal biointegration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1604545
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 26 2017

Fingerprint

Encapsulation
Electronic equipment
Networks (circuits)
Mechanics
electronics
electronic modules
twisting
silicones
Silicones
Stretching
interlayers
Skin
Multilayers
modules
Tissue
composite materials
Composite materials
elastomeric

Keywords

  • buckling
  • elastomeric encapsulation
  • stacked circuits
  • stretchable electronics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Xu, Renxiao ; Lee, Jung Woo ; Pan, Taisong ; Ma, Siyi ; Wang, Jiayi ; Han, June Hyun ; Ma, Yinji ; Rogers, John A. ; Huang, Yonggang. / Designing Thin, Ultrastretchable Electronics with Stacked Circuits and Elastomeric Encapsulation Materials. In: Advanced Functional Materials. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 4.
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Designing Thin, Ultrastretchable Electronics with Stacked Circuits and Elastomeric Encapsulation Materials. / Xu, Renxiao; Lee, Jung Woo; Pan, Taisong; Ma, Siyi; Wang, Jiayi; Han, June Hyun; Ma, Yinji; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang.

In: Advanced Functional Materials, Vol. 27, No. 4, 1604545, 26.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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