Desynchronization and Plasticity of Striato-frontal Connectivity in Major Depressive Disorder

Amber M. Leaver, Randall Espinoza, Shantanu H. Joshi, Megha Vasavada, Stephanie Njau, Roger P. Woods, Katherine L. Narr*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with dysfunctional corticolimbic networks, making functional connectivity studies integral for understanding the mechanisms underlying MDD pathophysiology and treatment. Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) studies analyze patterns of temporally coherent intrinsic brain activity in "resting-state networks" (RSNs). The default-mode network (DMN) has been of particular interest to depression research; however, a single RSN is unlikely to capture MDD pathophysiology in its entirety, and the DMN itself can be characterized by multiple RSNs. This, coupled with conflicting previous results, underscores the need for further research. Here, we measured RSFC in MDD by targeting RSNs overlapping with corticolimbic regions and further determined whether altered patterns of RSFC were restored with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). MDD patients exhibited hyperconnectivity between ventral striatum (VS) and the ventral default-mode network (vDMN), while simultaneously demonstrating hypoconnectivity with the anterior DMN (aDMN). ECT influenced this pattern: VS-vDMN hyperconnectivity was significantly reduced while VS-aDMN hypoconnectivity only modestly improved. RSFC between the salience RSN and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex was also reduced in MDD, but was not affected by ECT. Taken together, our results support a model of ventral/dorsal imbalance in MDD and further suggest that the VS is a key structure contributing to this desynchronization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4337-4346
Number of pages10
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume26
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Keywords

  • connectivity
  • default-mode network
  • depression
  • limbic
  • ventral striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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    Leaver, A. M., Espinoza, R., Joshi, S. H., Vasavada, M., Njau, S., Woods, R. P., & Narr, K. L. (2016). Desynchronization and Plasticity of Striato-frontal Connectivity in Major Depressive Disorder. Cerebral Cortex, 26(11), 4337-4346. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhv207