Detecting linguistic HCI markers in an online aphasia support group

Yoram M. Kalman*, Kathleen Adele Dolan Geraghty, Cynthia K Thompson, Darren Gergle

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aphasia is an acquired language disorder resulting from trauma or injury to language areas of the brain. Despite extensive research on the impact of aphasia on traditional forms of communication, little is known about the impact of aphasia on computer-mediated communication CMC). In this study we asked whether the well-documented language deficits associated with aphasia can be detected in online writing of people with aphasia. We analyzed 150 messages 14,754 wordsposted to an online aphasia support forum, by six people with aphasia and by four controls. Significant linguistic differences between people with aphasia and controls were detected, suggesting five putative linguistic HCI markers for aphasia. These findings suggest that interdisciplinary research on communication disorders and CMC has both applied and theoretical implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASSETS'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility
Pages65-70
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 27 2012
Event14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2012 - Boulder, CO, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 24 2012

Other

Other14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoulder, CO
Period10/22/1210/24/12

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Computer-mediated communication
  • HCI markers
  • Human factors
  • Online support groups
  • Unobtrusive monitoring
  • User modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

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  • Cite this

    Kalman, Y. M., Geraghty, K. A. D., Thompson, C. K., & Gergle, D. (2012). Detecting linguistic HCI markers in an online aphasia support group. In ASSETS'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 65-70) https://doi.org/10.1145/2384916.2384928