Detecting motor slowing in clinical high risk for psychosis in a computerized finger tapping model

Katherine S.F. Damme*, K. Juston Osborne, James M. Gold, Vijay A. Mittal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Finger tapping is sensitive to motor slowing and emerging symptoms in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR). A sensitive, computerized finger tapping task would be beneficial in early psychosis screening batteries. The study included 41 CHR and 32 healthy volunteers, who completed a computerized finger tapping task and clinical interviews. This computerized finger tapping task was sensitive to slowing in the CHR group compared to healthy volunteers, and as expected negative but not positive symptoms related to motor slowing. Computerized finger tapping tasks may be an easily dispersible tool for early symptom detection battery relevant to emerging negative symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-397
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience
Volume270
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

Keywords

  • Finger tapping
  • Motor
  • Psychosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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