Detection of a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease from synthetic and clinical samples using a nanoscale optical biosensor

Amanda J. Haes, Lei Chang, William L Klein*, Richard P Van Duyne

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

723 Scopus citations

Abstract

A nanoscale optical biosensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy has been developed to monitor the interaction between the antigen, amyloid-β derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs), and specific anti-ADDL antibodies. Using the sandwich assay format, this nanosensor provides quantitative binding information for both antigen and second antibody detection that permits the determination of ADDL concentration and offers the unique analysis of the aggregation mechanisms of this putative Alzheimer's disease pathogen at physiologically relevant monomer concentrations. Monitoring the LSPR-induced shifts from both ADDLs and a second polyclonal anti-ADDL antibody as a function of ADDL concentration reveals two ADDL epitopes that have binding constants to the specific anti-ADDL antibodies of 7.3 × 1012 M-1 and 9.5 × 108 M-1. The analysis of human brain extract and cerebrospinal fluid samples from control and Alzheimer's disease patients reveals that the LSPR nanosensor provides new information relevant to the understanding and possible diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2264-2271
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume127
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 23 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

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