Detection of keratin subtypes in routinely processed cervical tissue: implications for tumour classification and the study of cervix cancer aetiology

F. Smedts*, F. Ramaekers, M. Link, G. P. Vooijs, L. Lauerova, S. Troyanovsky, C. Schijf

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated the expression of keratin subtypes 7, 8, 10, 13, 14, 17, 18 and 19 in the normal cervix, in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions and in cervical carcinomas, using a selected panel of monoclonal keratin antibodies, reactive with routinely processed, formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue fragments. The reaction patterns derived for each keratin antibody were compared with known expression patterns of the various epithelia, previously examined in frozen tissues. Although the reactivity of the antibodies was generally acceptable, considerable modifications to the manufacturers' staining instructions were often necessary. For some antibodies, which were previously thought to be reactive with fresh frozen tissue only, we developed staining protocols rendering them reactive with routinely processed material. As with previous findings in frozen sections we observed increasing expression of keratins 7, 8, 17, 18 and 19 with increasing grade of CIN. In cervical carcinomas the differences in keratin detectability between the main categories were more pronounced than in frozen sections, probably due to fixation and processing. For routine pathology, keratin phenotyping of cervical lesions may be of value in classification. The fact that keratin 7 was detected for the first time in reserve cells, and that this keratin was also found to be expressed in a considerable number of CIN lesions and cervical carcinomas supports the suggestion that reserve cells are a common progenitor cell for these lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-155
Number of pages11
JournalVirchows Archiv
Volume425
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1994

Keywords

  • Cervix
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Intermediate filament proteins
  • Neoplasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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