Determinants of ventricular arrhythmias in mildly symptomatic patients with coronary artery disease and influence of inducible left ventricular dysfunction on arrhythmia frequency

C. M. Tracy, J. Winkler, E. Brittain, M. B. Leon, S. E. Epstein, R. O. Bonow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine the relation among ventricular arrhythmias, prognostic factors and reversible ischemia in coronary artery disease, 131 drug-free, minimally symptomatic patients were studied by radionuclide angiography and 24 hour Holter electrocardiographic monitoring. High grade ventricular arrhythmias (couplets, salvos of premature ventricular complexes and R on T phenomenon) were observed in 33 patients (25%) and were related to lower rest and exercise ejection fraction, greater number of stenotic coronary arteries and higher prevalence of regional wall motion abnormalities at rest (all p ≤ 0.1). Among patients with subnormal rest ejection fraction, high grade arrhythmias occurred with greater preva- lence in those with reversible left ventricular dysfunction (reduction in ejection fraction) during exercise compared with those with a normal ejection fraction response (59 versus 23%, p < 0.05), a relation observed principally in patients with multivessel disease. These data indicate that in minimally symptomatic patients with coronary artery disease, arrhythmias are related to both extent of disease and severity of regional and global ventricular dysfunction and are most prevalent in patients with ventricular dysfunction and evidence of inducible ischemia, factors indicating poor long-term prognosis during medical therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-488
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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