Development and Evaluation of an Online Mental Health Program for Medical Students

Emily G. Lattie*, Jennifer L. Duffecy, David C. Mohr, Kathleen Kashima

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Medical school presents a time of psychological distress for many students, who are less likely than the general population to seek mental health treatment due to multiple treatment barriers. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) programs may be an acceptable option for medical students. This study aims to assess acceptability and usability of ThinkFeelDo, an iCBT program, and to examine the impact of the program on perceived stress, quality of life, and the development of cognitive and behavioral coping skills. Method: Fourteen medical students (M age = 25.4 years, 50% female) participated in the 6-week ThinkFeelDo program and completed baseline and end of treatment assessments. Results: ThinkFeelDo was used (login M = 11.9, SD = 9.8) and was rated as somewhat useful. Participants requested further refinement of lessons to better fit the typical narrative of a medical student and endorsed interest in the program being offered at the beginning of medical school. At end of program, participants increased the frequency with which they used cognitive and behavioral coping skills, t(10) = -3.400, p =.007. Conclusions: Results of this study indicate that medical students are willing to utilize online mental health programs and may receive benefit. However, the sample was small, self-selected, and without a comparison group. Feedback collected through this study provides insight on how to effectively integrate iCBT programs into the medical school experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-645
Number of pages4
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Internet intervention
  • Medical students
  • Mental health
  • Prevention
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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