Development and Psychometric Characteristics of the TBI-QOL Independence Item Bank and Short Form and the TBI-QOL Asking for Help Scale

Pamela A. Kisala, David S. Tulsky*, Aaron J. Boulton, Allen Walter Heinemann, David E Victorson, Mark Sherer, Angelle M. Sander, Nancy Chiaravalloti, Noelle E. Carlozzi, Robin Hanks

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To develop an item response theory (IRT)-calibrated, patient-reported outcome measure of subjective independence for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: Large-scale item calibration field testing; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and graded response model IRT analyses. Setting: Five TBI Model System centers across the United States. Participants: Adults with complicated mild, moderate, or severe TBI (N=556). Outcome Measures: Traumatic Brain Injury–Quality of Life (TBI-QOL) Independence item bank and the TBI-QOL Asking for Help scale. Results: A total of 556 individuals completed 44 items in the Independence item pool. Initial factor analyses indicated that items related to the idea of “asking for help” were measuring a different construct from other items in the pool. These 9 items were set aside. Twenty-two other items were removed because of bimodal distributions and/or low item-total correlations. CFA supported unidimensionality of the remaining Independence items. Graded response model IRT analysis was used to estimate slopes and thresholds for the final 13 Independence items. An 8-item fixed-length short form was also developed. The 9 Asking for Help items were analyzed separately. One misfitting item was deleted, and the final 8 items became a fixed-length IRT-calibrated scale. Reliability was high for both measures. Conclusions: The IRT-calibrated TBI-QOL Independence item bank and short form and TBI-QOL Asking for Help scale may be used to measure important issues for individuals with TBI in research and clinical applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArchives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Psychometrics
Statistical Factor Analysis
Traumatic Brain Injury
Calibration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Brain
Research

Keywords

  • Brain injuries
  • Help-seeking behavior
  • Independent living
  • Patient outcome assessment
  • Personal autonomy
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Kisala, Pamela A. ; Tulsky, David S. ; Boulton, Aaron J. ; Heinemann, Allen Walter ; Victorson, David E ; Sherer, Mark ; Sander, Angelle M. ; Chiaravalloti, Nancy ; Carlozzi, Noelle E. ; Hanks, Robin. / Development and Psychometric Characteristics of the TBI-QOL Independence Item Bank and Short Form and the TBI-QOL Asking for Help Scale. In: Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation. 2019.
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Development and Psychometric Characteristics of the TBI-QOL Independence Item Bank and Short Form and the TBI-QOL Asking for Help Scale. / Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.; Boulton, Aaron J.; Heinemann, Allen Walter; Victorson, David E; Sherer, Mark; Sander, Angelle M.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Hanks, Robin.

In: Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kisala, Pamela A.

AU - Tulsky, David S.

AU - Boulton, Aaron J.

AU - Heinemann, Allen Walter

AU - Victorson, David E

AU - Sherer, Mark

AU - Sander, Angelle M.

AU - Chiaravalloti, Nancy

AU - Carlozzi, Noelle E.

AU - Hanks, Robin

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N2 - Objective: To develop an item response theory (IRT)-calibrated, patient-reported outcome measure of subjective independence for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: Large-scale item calibration field testing; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and graded response model IRT analyses. Setting: Five TBI Model System centers across the United States. Participants: Adults with complicated mild, moderate, or severe TBI (N=556). Outcome Measures: Traumatic Brain Injury–Quality of Life (TBI-QOL) Independence item bank and the TBI-QOL Asking for Help scale. Results: A total of 556 individuals completed 44 items in the Independence item pool. Initial factor analyses indicated that items related to the idea of “asking for help” were measuring a different construct from other items in the pool. These 9 items were set aside. Twenty-two other items were removed because of bimodal distributions and/or low item-total correlations. CFA supported unidimensionality of the remaining Independence items. Graded response model IRT analysis was used to estimate slopes and thresholds for the final 13 Independence items. An 8-item fixed-length short form was also developed. The 9 Asking for Help items were analyzed separately. One misfitting item was deleted, and the final 8 items became a fixed-length IRT-calibrated scale. Reliability was high for both measures. Conclusions: The IRT-calibrated TBI-QOL Independence item bank and short form and TBI-QOL Asking for Help scale may be used to measure important issues for individuals with TBI in research and clinical applications.

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KW - Personal autonomy

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