Development and testing of a vaccination message targeted to persons with spinal cord injuries and disorders

Sherri L. LaVela, Kenzie A. Cameron, Michael Priebe, Frances M. Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Objective: Individuals with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI&D) are at high-risk of complications and death after influenza and pneumonia. Respiratory vaccinations are effective in reducing infection and complications. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a multimedia educational message developed using a strong theoretical basis and targeted consumer input to modify negative perceptions, increase knowledge, and positively influence intentions and beliefs regarding respiratory vaccinations. Methods: Veterans with SCI&D (n = 36) completed a pretest questionnaire, viewed the message, and, after a clinic visit, completed a posttest questionnaire. Mean differences were examined using paired t tests. Providers (n = 25) were surveyed about the content, comprehension, and reception of the message; response frequencies were examined. Results: Respondents showed positive changes in beliefs from pre- to posttest on multiple items related to knowledge, severity, and self efficacy and response efficacy. There were no changes in perception of personal susceptibility to these diseases. Most providers were in favor of using the message in this population. Conclusions: A brief theory-based multimedia intervention is a feasible way to improve knowledge and attitudes about respiratory vaccinations in high-risk populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-52
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Spinal Cord Medicine
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Extended parallel process model
  • Health campaigns
  • Influenza
  • Pneumococcal
  • Pneumonia
  • Prevention
  • Respiratory infections
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Theory of planned behavior
  • Vaccination
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Development and testing of a vaccination message targeted to persons with spinal cord injuries and disorders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this