Development of a parent-report cognitive function item bank using item response theory and exploration of its clinical utility in computerized adaptive testing

Jin Shei Lai*, Zeeshan Butt, Frank Zelko, David Cella, Kevin R. Krull, Mark W. Kieran, Stewart Goldman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

ObjectiveThe purpose of this study is to report the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of a parent-report perceived cognitive function (pedsPCF) item bank.MethodsFrom the U.S. general population, 1,409 parents of children aged 7-17 years completed 45 pedsPCF items. Their psychometric properties were evaluated using Item Response Theory (IRT) approaches. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and discriminant function analysis were used to predict clinical problems on child behavior checklist (CBCL) scales. A computerized adaptive testing (CAT) simulation was used to evaluate clinical utility.ResultsThe final 43-item pedsPCF item bank demonstrates no item bias, has acceptable IRT parameters, and provides good prediction of related clinical problems. CAT simulation resulted in correlations of 0.98 between CAT and the full-length pedsPCF.ConclusionsThe pedsPCF has sound psychometric properties, U.S. general population norms, and a brief-yet-precise CAT version is available. Future work will evaluate pedsPCF in other clinical populations in which cognitive function is important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)766-779
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • assessment
  • cancer and oncology
  • cognitive assessment
  • computer applications/eHealth
  • neuropsychology
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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