Development of severe stenosis in a previously purely regurgitant, congenitally bicuspid aortic valve

Jay M. Kalan*, Charles L. McIntosh, Robert O. Bonow, William C. Roberts

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Acongenitally bicuspid aortic valve may function normally, it may be stenotic with or without associated regurgitation or it may be purely regurgitant (no associated stenosis).1,2 Such a valve may function normally for many years and then it may become stenotic (as calcific deposits build up) or it may become purely regurgitant (because of superimposed infective endocarditis or because of reasons unclear). Once a bicuspid valve develops some degree of stenosis, its course thereafter is one of gradually worsening stenosis; once a bicuspid valve develops some degree of pure regurgitation (without associated stenosis), its course thereafter is one of gradually worsening regurgitation. Recently, we encountered a man who 8 years earlier had evidence of severe pure aortic regurgitation (no element of stenosis) and thereafter he went on to develop severe aortic valve stenosis with virtual loss of the regurgitation. To our knowledge, conversion from pure aortic regurgitation to severe aortic stenosis has not been reported. This report records such an occurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)988-989
Number of pages2
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume62
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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